Kevin Lipscomb

Changes to how we handle STROKE

A message primarily to: Core Ops Members Firefighters Changes to how we handle STROKE New screening tool, new receiving facility BEFAST For a couple of decades or so, our preferred stroke screening exam was the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale.  It was composed of the following elements: F:  Facial droop,...

The Preemption Pause

A message primarily to: Operations members The Preemption Pause Not so fast, buckaroo I had planned for this to be my Sterile Cockpit article, but there’s something else we want to share with you first. Recent changes Clearly our earlier articles have had an impact.  Personnel have been doing...

Tight Dispatch Cycle

A message primarily to: Operations members Tight Dispatch Cycle Another key concept from the new radio Communications Manual First, a brief recap The main message from the last article in this series was that we want all on-air personnel to have a mental Common Operating Picture of how calls...

Common Operating Picture

A message primarily to: Operations members Common Operating Picture A key concept from the new radio Communications Manual Background There’s a feature in the new CAD that’s supposed to help reduce response times.  It’s called Automatic Resource Location (ARL), and it is GPS-based.  When an incident needs an ambulance,...

Mishap Report

A message primarily to: All members Mishap Report It will never happen to you, right? Here are summaries of mishaps recently reported to the EMS Department.  What could have been done to prevent these? A duty crew found a small mystery dent on an ambulance’s back bumper. An ambulance...

New radio Communications Manual

A message primarily to: Operations members New radio Communications Manual Radio traffic reflects organizational efficiency and the attitude of members When most of us are on duty, using the radio and MDT systems may only be an afterthought.  As interns, we used those systems the way the released members...

Getting Nightingale involved…

A message primarily to: Chiefs Captains ALS providers Getting Nightingale involved… …efficiently and effectively In Virginia Beach, we rarely use helicopter medevac services.  When we do, we are committing people and resources to a high-visibility, high-risk, high-cost event with a potentially high reward, so it’s critical that we do...

No A/C in the back? Check this first!

A message primarily to: All current members No A/C in the back? Check this first! The following is important information that will help reduce ambulance out-of-service time. In the patient compartment, several of our ambulances use a Danhard M600MC Rotary Thermostat provided in systems built by Hoseline Inc.  This...

New: Gear Accountability Logs

Knowing how our gear moves around is at least half the battle For the second time in the past year, one of our members went looking for an IV box and a drug box that were supposed to be in secure storage, and found them missing.  Notifications were made,...

Reaching our STEMI quality management goals

It’s a team sport The evidence is clear:  EMS can make a difference in STEMI cases.  We accomplish this by being fast, efficient, and effective at the following: Identifying STEMIs Notifying the hospital that we have a STEMI patient Treating the patient as we move toward a STEMI Receiving...